World accommodating new religious movements

In 2016, the number of refugees reached an all-time high of 22 million people.

17 million of them are under the protection of the UNHCR - The UN Refugee Agency.

The study investigates in historical and empirical manner the implication of the Sharia policy for the formation/transformation of the identities of the different ethno-religious groups within the two states ; the ways in which the ethno-religious groups have shaped their own identity in response to the Sharia policy ; the role of state institutions in shaping the cultural order of the multicultural settings ; and the construction of group identities and boundaries.

In doing this, the study asks the following questions : what forms of discord or alliance have emerged over the Sharia policy and what are the implications of these transformations on the dynamics of these states ?

The fundamental issue about the Sharia is that it lies at the heart of identity politics in Nigeria [2]. How can they appeal against Sharia decisions outside the Sharia system ?

Supposing people want Sharia and other Nigerians don’t. At the moment, between either Sharia or no Sharia, nothing is negotiable, whereas there may be substantial area of negotiability between these two positions. [3]In the light of globalization, how do we determine the limits within which we will implement Sharia so that the rights of non-Muslims are respected ?

The Palaung are the most recent ethnic group to arrive in Thailand.

UN refugee data is complemented by 100 contextual narrative stories detailing the events that triggered the major refugee crises of the last four decades.

The region (or at least a part of it) is also known as the Holy Land and is held sacred among .

Since the 20th century it has been the object of conflicting claims of Jewish and Arab national movements, and the conflict has led to prolonged violence and, in several instances, open warfare.

The word Palestine derives from Philistia, the name given by Greek writers to the land of the in “Syria Palaestina,” designating the southern portion of the province of Syria, and made its way thence into Arabic, where it has been used to describe the region at least since the early Islamic era.

After Roman times the name had no official status until after , when it was adopted for one of the regions mandated to Great Britain; in addition to an area roughly comprising present-day Israel and the West Bank, the mandate included the territory east of the Jordan River now constituting the Hashimite Kingdom of Jordan, which Britain placed under an administration separate from that of Palestine immediately after receiving the mandate for the territory.

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